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Made in the USABerry Compliant

Our most versatile military pack.

The CREWCAB is our variable-capacity, do-anything military pack. It can be compressed into a low-profile, 1900 cu-in pack or expanded to 5000 cu-in. It can carry EOD gear, Pelican cases, robots, Load Cells, ammo cans, even casevacs in a pinch.. For additional storage, add the DaypackLid. The CREWCAB excels at carrying weird loads well.

  • NICE Frame for comfort and stability under the heaviest loads
  • Bolstered Ventilation and Stability (BVS) system increases stability of the pack over armor
  • MYSTERY RANCH Load Cells are designed to fit perfectly in the CREWCAB
  • Compatible with the Daypack Lid which locks on loads that extend above the top of the frame
  • Zippered back panel pocket accommodates up to three 100 oz water bladders
  • Recommended accessory: MYSTERY RANCH Daypack Lid
  • NSN#: Coyote 8465-01-611-9142
  • Volume: 1900 cu in (31l) - 5000 cu in (82l)
  • Weight: 7 lbs 11 oz (3.5 kg)
  • Dimensions: 21.5-81"x12"x6" (55-206x53x15cm)
  • Frame System: NICE Frame
  • Country Of Manufacture: USA
  • Intended Use: Extended Missions

Frequenty Asked Questions

We're moving to a kitted system so that we can design and build packs and frames that are optimized for integration based on the function of the product. There are some cool new things in the works. In the meantime, we may be able to accommodate pack only orders based on available inventory - contact MR Customer Service or call 406-585-1428

As much as we would like to be able to offer our military/LE/ firefighter customers a discount on our packs, we have government contracts in these markets that prevent us from doing so.

The only repair that we can offer on Dana Design products is a replacement back foam pad on packs with the ArcFlex body panel design. We can ship the foam to you and you can easily install it yourself without having to send the pack in to be repaired. Replacement back foam pads are $15.00 plus shipping. For any other Dana Design pack repairs, please contact Marmot or try the following reputable gear repair companies:

Marmot Warranty:

(888) 311-2900

Mon - Fri : 7:30am - 5pm (PST)

marmot_warranty@marmot.com

Boulder Mountain Repair:

2200 Central Ave. Suite F

Boulder, CO80301

(303) 499-3634

repairs@bouldermtnrepair.com

Rainy Pass Repair:

4415 Stone Way N.

Seattle, WA98103

(206) 523-8135

 

We are not set up to perform custom work on individual orders and no, we cannot build a pack for you in a custom color. If your concern is in regards to sizing please give us a call at 406-585-1428.

Also, please know that modifying your Mystery Ranch pack may void the lifetime warranty, so please think first before you start ripping straps off and cutting holes in your pack to make it more aerodynamic for winged flight.

First, start by washing your pack with hot water in the shower. Use a mild detergent like Dawn to get minor dirt and grime out of your pack. Dry the pack out of direct sunlight. DO NOT USE HARSH CHEMICALS TO CLEAN YOUR PACK. If you need to get odors/blood out of your hunting pack, please use Atsko Sport-Wash Laundry Detergent

We always recommend that you size down for the waist belt. If you fall in-between sizes on the yoke, we recommend that you size up.

Mystery Ranch accepts returns for a refund within 60 days of the original purchase date. Items must be returned in brand new, unused condition, and shipping charges are non-refundable. Please give us a call at 406-585-1428, and we can get you set up with a Return Authorization (RA#).

If you are in need of a different size yoke or waist belt, please give us a call at 406-585-1428.

Why did you add a production facility in the Philippines?

We added a production facility at Clark Field in the Philippines because we needed the capacity to build for customers both domestic and abroad who don't require (Berry compliant) U.S. production and / or don't want to pay a premium for products built in the U.S.A

How do I know if the pack I want is made in the US or PI?

It will be noted on the product page on our website and you are always welcome to call us and ask if you don't see the "US" or "world" icons that denote production location.

Is the quality of the packs the same?

Yes. We still seek out the highest quality materials and construction methods available. We have rigorously run through every product and inspected them ourselves to certify the quality of a good matches our US standards. The quality is the same, so much that we have to mark the product so we don't confuse the two ourselves. Our distributors who have received product from the U.S. and from Clark Field have not been able to tell the difference without looking at the label.

How do you ensure the quality is the same?

Our sewers at Clark Field are trained using the same protocol we use in the United States. We spend the time to send our trainers and inspectors to the P.I. to consult and educate the sewers on our methods and quality standards. The short of it: PI production workers are trained by our people, they are our people.

Will Warranty or Repair procedures change?

No, our warranty and repair will remain the same regardless of production location. We hang our hat on being the most durable and comfortable packs on the market and that will not change.

For more information please contact MR Customer Service or call 406-585-1428

This pack is a work of functional art. It will carry more than any normal person should ever try to move from one place to another. You can cinch it flat against the frame and you have a great daypack. Or you can open it up, place anything heavy or awkward against the frame, cinch it down, and carry a heavy load that feels about half it's actual weight. While a friend of mine thought it was a bit heavy when empty, after we loaded 50 lbs. into it, he remarked it felt lighter together than the 50lb. alone. Maybe it's magic? I just know it really works and the Multicam looks cool to boot. Keep up the quality work. I own 2 MR packs and love them both.
I bought my Crew Cab more than 2 years ago and have had lots of time to think about this. I live and work out of hotels, tents, vehicles, airplanes, the back of a van - etc... I have been on the road since 2009. My MRCC has been my pack of choice since 2014
The team at Mystery Ranch deserve a huge pat on the back for this design.
Too many people write reviews only when a product does not meet expectations - and in today's do it cheaper/faster world there is a lot of that. Just not here... This pack/frame combo is nothing short of amazing.

I have been lucky enough to have used almost all of the top manufacturers for the purpose of business travel, adventure travel / prolonged trekking / excursions, hunting and bushcraft. My Crew Cab is my favorite for ALL of these activities.

When flying, I will take my Crew Cab and top lid (in a stripped down/small configuration) as a carry on and a large duffel bag as a checked bag - once I get to my destination - the checked bag is reclaimed, the Crew Cab is opened up and it swallows the duffel with ease - I can carry everything on my back and my hands are free. If I want things organized I'll use the load cells. It's an amazing system.

The weights this thing can support with real COMFORT are amazing. The load is transferred more efficiently to your hips than any other pack I have tried - I am not here to trash talk other packs - only to praise Mystery Ranch for their amazing design.
I have many other packs in my possession, and I have often tried to get things that I think might be better than my Crew Cab - and every time, on some level, it is a failure. This system is the best I have ever used.

Need to carry a bunch of equipment, tooling, and parts on foot out to where your ATV went down - then spend the night on site, whether you fix it or not because it's a 6 hour hike (one way) followed by a 4 hour repair? I did it - and my Crew Cab made it possible...

Typically, with a lot of things in life, to get one thing, you compromise on another - For years my ideal pack was a metallic, external shelf frame, with a hard plastic container strapped to it, carrying a pack either in the container or strapped somewhere else on the frame... This is all well and good, (until you fly commercial...) but the overall capacity is diminished and the frame is not nearly as comfortable as the NICE/Crew Cab. The c/g also starts to get away from you if you are on dodgy terrain as it is far off of your back. Now, put a hard plastic container INSIDE the Crew Cab and it meets this level of versatility AND has a far more comfortable, controllable weight distribution.
Initially, I was sort of skeptical about the strength of the NICE frame - believe me - after 2 years of hard use it still looks and performs like the day I received it. It has been used almost DAILY and it is still in great shape.

Here is my very honest break down of this pack. I am basing this on my own personal experiences and also comparing to every other pack I have ever used.

Versatility [with the top lid] 10/10
Comfort 10/10
Build Quality 10/10
Durability 9/10
Capacity 10/10
Ergonomics / ease of handling in bush / uneven terrain 9/10

If I needed a pack and could only have one... My Crew Cab would be the one. If it gets lost, stolen, shot up or burnt to a cinder - I would replace it ASAP.

Great job at Mystery Ranch!
It is appreciated.
Pack feels heavy but that all goes away as soon as you shoulder it. This review comes in a little late, as I've been meaning to express my appreciation for this piece of gear. Last season I shot a bull way back in the hills. It was a random afternoon encounter and we recovered him right around 4pm. After quartering, boning and bagging the animal, we lit out with both hind quarters back to the trailhead. The comfort of the pack under weight on the way out was superb but a side note to this adventure.

We woke up sore and soon the next day and got after it, hiking up to get the rest of the cache in the cool morning moonlight. We had hung the two remaining quarters because we were in pretty thick bear country, and without fail, one of the quarters hung low enough for an opportunistic blacky to make hay. My partner felt fine with this outcome as he enjoyed the sunny day hauling out a pack of water, clif bars, various snacks and empty game bags.

He was quite a ways in front of me as he neared a logging road on state land closed to motorized vehicles. Like a mirage, a tired pickup hauling a flat bed full of logs rolled up over the rise on the same road. By the time i made it to the road, my partner and the rancher with permission to use the road and two other guys riding with him were each holding a cracked cold beer and talking about the country. Like princes, they not only gave us a cold one, but offered a ride back to our truck. One of the guys even took the pack from my shoulder and planted it on the flat bed.

As I crawled up to ride on one of the logs on the way out, I eyed the pack sitting there precariously and thought, "That doesn't look very secure." Whether weary from the pack out or just plain lazy, I did nothing to act on my concern and lo and behold, about 20 yards into the ride, like a slow motion scene from a Greek tragedy, the pack slowly rolled off the bed and hit the dirt like a bag of bricks under the weight of the front quarter. Despite our yells, my cries, the rancher didn't stop until the pack rested perfectly under the trailers duel wheels and about 2 tons of timber. Upon recovery, we were all stunned to find little damage to the pack and it's contents. A couple of buckles had broke, the load lifter fractured in one spot. Other than that, all was well.

We awoke the next day and lit out on the last morning of our trip. My partner had to be back in Bozeman for his kids' football games. I called a bull in for him which he capitalized on and we quickly realized what little time we had to dispatch the animal. We set out with purpose, quartering and boning the young bull. The merciless tick of the clock forced us into a decision; sack up and take the elk out in one hall or make his wife regret our elk hunting trips forever. Really, there was only one option. So with a pack freshly run over by a great ton of weight and only fairly bruised. I shouldered my Crew Cab holding have an elk, and packed it out 4 miles as if the pack were brand new and just fitted in the shop.

I haven't even replaced the busted buckles and load lifter because, hey, she still rides fine. This is a tough pack.